page contents My title page contents

Your Body’s Inheritance Fund- How to Preserve your Kidney Energy

by Michael

Burnout is a commonly used term these days because of the hectic lifestyles we lead. Knowing how to recognise the signs can save you a lot of time and energy dealing with the effects of suffering from Burnout. Chinese medicine is a well-known method for treating the symptoms of Burnout with the use of acupuncture and herbal medicine to help you bounce back faster.

Western science defines burnout as the experience of long term exhaustion and diminished interest, especially in one’s career and lifestyle.

According to Chinese Medicine the concept of burnout relates to your Kidney energy being depleted. It states that the energy of your Kidneys is the foundation for all of your bodily processes especially your growth, development and reproduction.

What this means is when you’re burning the candle at both ends by working or playing hard or even experiencing burnout, your Kidney energy is being used up. This can lead to early signs of ageing, fatigue and body breakdown.

The lifestyle of a westerner is usually a busy one where they work, juggle a family a career and a lifestyle. Chinese Medicine states the ways we deplete our Kidney energy is:

Excess Stress
Overworking
Fear & Anxiety
Alcohol and Drug Use
Excess Coffee and cigarettes
Excess sex for men
Bearing many children for women
Toxins in food and water including heavy metals such as mercury, lead and aluminium (from cookware)
Excess sweet foods

If people are healthy, robust and highly resistant to illness they have strong Kidney energy. When your Kidney energy is becoming depleted you can tell because you will find a weak pulse in the wrist and see signs of:

Extreme Fatigue
Feeling depressed or low spirits
Low back pain
Knee problems
Bone Issues- Osteopaenia, Osteoporosis
Arthritic conditions
Deafness
Ringing in the ears
Dizziness
Early hair greying, thinning or loss
Brittle nails
Male/ Female infertility
Urinary problems
Weak pelvic floor muscles
Lacking willpower, motivation

The easiest way to demonstrate how Kidney energy has an impact on our life is to picture an elderly person. Because of their age and where they are in their life, their Kidney energy is in natural decline. This means the body’s ability to repair itself slows, bodily functions also change and begin to slow down. If you’re in your seventies or eighties and experiencing this, you’ve done well to preserve your Kidney energy. You may even know an elderly person that still has a lot of ‘get up and go’ – they would probably have s strong kidney energy.

When people work and play hard and don’t give their body recuperative therapy and rest they can speed up that ageing process. Seeing people in their twenties and thirties experiencing burnout and Kidney energy depletion is an unfortunate by-product of our lifestyles today and can be helped with Chinese Medicine.

The reason why this is concerning is because Kidney energy is finite and limited. It can be conserved but not replenished. There are several sources of energy for the body, and the Kidney energy is one large source of which there are two types;

The first type is your congenital energy. Think of this as your body’s financial inheritance from your parents. This is essentially what it translates to according to ancient classical Chinese Medicine texts that describe Jing or Essence as the energy you inherit from your parents. This is what makes up your constitution, whether it is weak or strong. You got it from your parents.

A second reservoir of Kidney energy relies on the essence (inheritance) to then fuel the rest of the organs and body systems. The Chinese name is Yuan Qi. Think of this as a term deposit account. This too can be conserved and replenished but not as frequently. You still have the ability to access your ‘funds’ once in a while, yet it still remains relatively preserved. It can be drawn upon when needed.

A third source of general energy is of course from the food we eat and the air we breathe. This can be restored and replenished, think of this as you savings account. We make deposits and withdrawals daily and frequently. The quality of what we eat drink and breath will still determine how energetic we feel on a daily basis here.

When the quality of our food, drink and air don’t provide us with enough energy, our body will start drawing upon its reserves in it’s term deposit and once that’s depleted enough then too with the Inheritance. Again this is of concern because once you start tapping into your inheritance, it can’t be replenished. This is a common scenario for people experiencing burnout.

Comparing your energy accounts

Your Body’s Inheritance Your Body’s Term Deposit Your Body’s Savings Account
Congenital energy Congenital energy Acquired Energy
Kidney Essence Kidney Source energy Energy from food and air
Finite/Limited Finite/ Limited Unlimited as you keep eating and breathing
Can Conserve but not replenish Can conserve and replenish but not as often Can use and replenish
Stored in the Kidneys Stored in the Kidneys Stored in the Lungs (Air) and Stomach (Food)
Inherited from parents at time of conception Supported by Congenital energy (Inheritance) Supported by Congenital energy (Term deposit)
Constitution General energy levels Daily energy levels
Jing Yuan Qi Gu Qi & Da Qi

Burnout can be prevented and treated by strengthening and tonifying the Kidney energy with simple formulas that contain herbs such as Rhemmania, Dioscorea, Poria and Mou Tan Bark. Specific acupuncture points also stimulate and tonification of the Yuan Qi type of Kidney energy. Many clients come in on a monthly basis to get their regular check up on their Kidney energy to ensure they protect their inheritance. So there are chemical and drug free solutions to burnout that work on treating the cause, not just the symptoms, allowing you to get back to feeling energetic in your day-to-day routine.

Katika Funnell - Acupuncture Practitioner

Your Body’s Inheritance Fund- How to Preserve your Kidney Energy is a post from: Outdoor Group Training Sydney

Training Timetable

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: